Call them Slogans. Call them Motivation


Eternal pursuit.
Imagine this.
Bringing solutions.
Everybody needs a break.
Enjoy.
Be the leader.
Comfort of your home.
Beauty of simplicity.
Thinking ahead.
We are one.

Learning Body language from Vanessa van edwards – her newsletter i subscribe


I found Vanessa Van Edwards on Udemy when I was learning and beginning my Toastmasters Pathways journey. In one of the exercises we have there, we have to research a topic and speak. I found Apart from Content, it was Vocal variety, Gestures and Body Language, Personality which had important place in a Public Speaker’s repertoire.

Her focus and Special Expertise lay in BODY LANGUAGE. You can see the newsletter below, go to her website and take her Udemy courses if you are so inclined.

Are you ready for some interesting science facts? Me too!
As you might know, once a month I gather all of my favorite studies and tips into one fascinating, interesting, unique little newsletter. My goal is to share facts with you that you can then share with others. So then they say,
That’s so interesting!
…I also like to make them a game for you. Here’s what I got for you today:
1. Republicans prefer politicians with…

  1. deep voice and a square jaw
  2. big eyes and a longer than average face
  3. above average height
  4. small ears and bushy eyebrows

Seriously, research looked at this. This study found Republicans prefer politicians with 1. deep voice and a square jaw! I am gearing up for a big US election season. In fact, please mark your calendars to watch the US Presidential debate with me on September, 29th! My Watch Guide will help you look for interesting cues. I also analyzed the last five Presidential Debates for your amusement!

Presidential Debate Analysis + Watch Guides

I also analyzed of Kamala Harris’ body language. It’s going to be an interesting election year…



2. In conversation we tend to…

  1. Overestimate how much people like us
  2. Underestimate how much people like us

Does she like me?! Is a refrain I constantly say in my head. Good news! This study finds we tend to 2. Underestimate how much people like us!
Remember: You are likable. You are worthy.
3. Research says you should trust your…

  1. dog
  2. horoscope
  3. aha moments
  4. nightmares

You have a problem. You have been trying to solve it for hours. You go to sleep. You wake up at 2:00 a.m. thinking….”aha! I know the answer.” Turns out that you should trust that 3. aha moment! If you have taken any of our courses you know I am obsessed with aha moments. So I’m thrilled this study found when a solution to a problem seems to have come out of thin air, it’s most likely right.

From the study:
“A series of experiments conducted by a team of researchers determined that a person’s sudden insights are often more accurate at solving problems than thinking them through analytically.”Bottom line: Trust yourself.
4. Some of Beethoven’s famous works may have been inspired by…

  1. His cat
  2. His daughter
  3. His view of the ocean
  4. His heartbeat

A cardiologist, medical historian, and a musicologist teamed up to analyze Beethoven’s famous works. They found some of his rhythms may in fact reflect the irregular rhythms of his own heart, caused by cardiac arrhythmia! 4. his heartbeat might be what inspired his work!

…you never know what can be your spark of inspiration! Be sure to check out our post:

40 Productive Things to Do When You’re Bored

5. True or False: How much you worry can change over time.
I have come out publicly as a neurotic. And it turns out science has found that the worrying part of our brain can change over time (true!). AND this is different for men and women.
“Women high in neuroticism tended to have thinner cortex in the anterior cingulate with increasing age, while men high in neuroticism tended to have thicker cortex in the anterior cingulate with increasing age, compared to those with lower levels of neuroticism.”
So… don’t get mad at your partner, friend, spouse for worrying too much–they can’t help it!
To your success,
Vanessa

A SPECIAL DAY TOMORROW – 12TH SEPTEMBER 2020.


Beside the point? Punctuation is dead, long live punctuation | Aeon Essays


Photo by Corbis/Getty

Florence Hazrat

is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the School of English at the University of Sheffield, working on parentheses in Renaissance romance. Her first book ‘Refrains in Early Modern Literature’ is forthcoming, and she is currently writing a book called ‘Standing on Points: The History and Culture of Punctuation’.Listen here

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Punctuation is dead – or is it? If you’ve ever texted ‘im here’ or ‘its in the car’, you’re in good company. Most of us have, at some point since the dawn of texting, transgressed the boundaries of good grammar, and swallowed one apostrophe or another in the name of speed or convenience. Studies have shown that such textisms as deliberate spelling mistakes, abbreviations and omission of apostrophes don’t deteriorate language skills, but boost them – provided such texting goes hand in hand with ‘proper’ grammar education.

Suppressing the little typographical hook that is the apostrophe might, however, pose graver issues when it occurs in public, such as in ads or pub signs, or even street names. Is it different if the state flaunts language rules? Enter the international Apostrophe Protection Society, with its attempts to call out misuse and spread good practice. But November 2019 saw the announcement of the society’s demise, and owing not only to the highly respectable age of its founder John Richards (96): it would close, the society said, because of the ‘ignorance and laziness present in modern times’. The announcement made global news, sky-rocketing the traffic on the charmingly old-school website some 600 times, which led to its temporary disappearance from the web, and an outcry against the society’s closure. Punctuation habits might be changing, but we still care.

Are prescribed grammar rules necessary, though, or a relic of some fussy conservatism and elitist era? Do we really need apostrophes (or any other mark of punctuation for that matter) or could we get rid of them for the sake of brevity? Is Princes Street rather than Prince’s or even the formidable Princes’ Street really a sign of our careless inattention to detail today? If punctuation can fall away and the words still make sense, why did we need it in the first place? Punctuation, like any other cultural production, has a tumultuous history full of public good and personal interest.

Intellectual dark web


Mathews and old-ish wound.

LISTEN: BIG-WAVE STORYTELLER MARK MATHEWS ON THE INTELLECTUAL DARK WEB, KICKING OPIATES AND THE EXTRAVAGANCE OF EVIL, “THERE’S DARKNESS IN YOU AND IF YOU DON’T MANAGE YOUR LIFE AND FRAME IT WITH MEANING, YOU CAN BECOME BITTER… VERY FAST.”

Derek Rielly

By Derek Rielly

21 hours ago

Crippled innumerable times, told he’d never walk again, now a keynote speaker of considerable note…

Today’s guest on Dirty Water, Mark Mathews, presents, irresistibly, as a keynote speaker of considerable fame and even a little fortune who came from the bruising circuit of Maroubra, Sydney, via the cutthroat athleticism of professional big-wave surfing.

He is a ruminative man, as you’ll soon hear.

Give him one little opening for the point he wants to make and down he comes upon you, in under your guard, flashing and relentless as a rapier.

Mathews has been crippled and winged innumerable times,

Told he’ll never surf again,

Never walk again.

A cracked plate that can never be warmed on the stove nor brought out for company. Good only to hold crackers late at night or to go into the fridge under the leftovers.

But where a lesser man might sink into the velvet lazy chair of opiates and pity, descending, eventually, into a hell of despondency, he is optimism radiant and roaring.

Faith vindicated.

What I learned from President Obama | Jon Favreau (speechwriter) | UCD Literary & Historical Society – YouTube


US President Barack Obama’s former chief speechwriter Jon Favreau was presented with the James Joyce Award from the UCD Literary & Historical Society, University College Dublin. Once described by US President Obama as his “mind reader”, Jon Favreau’s words are credited as having contributed to getting Barack Obama elected President. Favreau worked on both the 2008 and 2012 election campaigns as chief speechwriter, and later served as Head of Speechwriting in the White House. Previous recipients of the UCD Literary & Historical Society, James Joyce Award include: Hollywood comedian, Will Ferrell; the Beatle’s music producer and arranger, the man known as the Fifth Beatle, Sir George Martin; Harry Potter author, JK Rowling; Nobel prize-winning economist, Professor Paul Krugman; former Monty Python, Michael Palin; and The Who frontman and legendary rock star, Roger Daltrey. The UCD James Joyce Award is named after the University College Dublin alumni and author of Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, James Joyce. It is presented by the UCD Literary and Historical Society to individuals who have achieved outstanding success in their given field.

What I learned from President Obama | Jon Favreau (speechwriter) | UCD Literary & Historical Society – YouTube

Toastmasters International -Famous Speechwriters


FOUR FAMOUS SPEECHWRITERS Toastmasters International has celebrated the art of public speaking since its inception, developing educational programs to grow transferable skills in communication and leadership. At Toastmasters clubs, members don’t just learn how to speak; they also learn how to write. And like any type of writing, speechwriting is a form of art. Today, we recognize a few great speechwriters. Jon Favreau The much-talked-about Jon Favreau first gained fame in 2008, when the then-27-year-old was named director of speechwriting for U.S. President Barack Obama. After a chance meeting with the future president while working on the John Kerry presidential campaign in 2004, Favreau began working for Obama the following year, when Obama was still a U.S. senator. Two years later, Favreau was on the campaign trail again, this time leading Obama’s speechwriting team. Favreau is famously credited as the primary writer for Obama’s 2009 inaugural speech. Ronald Miller British-born Sir Ronald Graeme Miller was a World War II veteran, a playwright writing scripts for MGM Studios in Hollywood, an actor, and a speechwriter for three British prime ministers. He is the man behind one of Margaret Thatcher’s most famous lines. In 1980, during a pivotal moment in the prime minister’s career, Thatcher addressed the Conservative Party conference, stating that she refused to perform a U-turn in the face of criticism of her liberalization of the economy. Playing on the title of Christopher Fry’s popular play “The Lady’s Not for Burning,” she said, “The lady’s not for turning.” Graham Freudenberg One of Australia’s most famous speechwriters, Graham Freudenberg has written over a thousand speeches for the country’s Labor Party, including those for Arthur Caldwell, Bob Hawke, Neville Wren, Bob Carr, Mark Latham and Gough Whitlam. While the speechwriter has been recognized for his large body of work, it is Whitlam’s “It’s Time” campaign speech in 1972 that remains his most famous. Peggy Noonan An author and a columnist for The Wall Street Journal, Peggy Noonan staked her claim to speechwriting fame as a primary writer for former U.S. President Ronald Reagan. Her notable speeches include Reagan’s “Boys of Pointe du Hoc” address, given on the 40th anniversary of D-Day—the day Allied troops invaded Normandy in World War II—as well as the former president’s address after the space shuttle Challenger explosion in 1986. Later, while working for then-U.S. Vice President George H.W. Bush, Noonan coined the catchphrase “a kinder, gentler nation.” A version of this article appeared in the March 2015 issue of the Toastmaster Magazine tablet app.

Toastmasters International -Famous Speechwriters

https://www.toastmasters.org/magazine/articles/famous-speechwriters

Re-orient life


The individual soul has to realize its identity with the Supreme Universal Soul with full consciousness.

Men shall have re-orientation of life in the light of this Ancient Truth; and they will readjust their attitude towards their neighbours in everyday life.

To perceive the spiritual value of oneness is to promote real unity and cooperation; brotherhood then becomes a spontaneous outcome of true perception.

——-AVATAR MEHER BABA

[GEMS FROM THE DISCOURSES OF MEHER BABA By Meher Baba. An Avatar Meher Baba Trust eBook June 2011. Copyright © 1945 by Circle Productions, Inc. (a New York Corporation), Copyright © Adi K. Irani, 1967 Copyright © 2007, Avatar Meher Baba Perpetual Public Charitable Trust, Ahmednagar, India.]

Provoke like a mentor – Quotes collected via Goodreads.com


“Say ‘provoking’ again. Your mouth looks provocative when you do.”
— Becca Fitzpatrick (Hush, Hush (Hush, Hush, #1))
Mother Teresa
“These are the few ways we can practice humility:

To speak as little as possible of one’s self.

To mind one’s own business.

Not to want to manage other people’s affairs.

To avoid curiosity.

To accept contradictions and correction cheerfully.

To pass over the mistakes of others.

To accept insults and injuries.

To accept being slighted, forgotten and disliked.

To be kind and gentle even under provocation.

Never to stand on one’s dignity.

To choose always the hardest.”
— Mother Teresa (The Joy in Loving: A Guide to Daily Living)

Soren Kierkegaard
“The Bible is very easy to understand. But we Christians are a bunch of scheming swindlers. We pretend to be unable to understand it because we know very well that the minute we understand, we are obliged to act accordingly.”
— Søren Kierkegaard (Provocations: Spiritual Writings of Kierkegaard)
William S. Burroughs
“There is nothing more provocative than minding your own business.”
— William S. Burroughs (The Place of Dead Roads)
Soraya Chemaly
“Anger is an assertion of rights and worth. It is communication, equality, and knowledge. It is intimacy, acceptance, fearlessness, embodiment, revolt, and reconciliation. Anger is memory and rage. It is rational thought and irrational pain. Anger is freedom, independence, expansiveness, and entitlement. It is justice, passion, clarity, and motivation. Anger is instrumental, thoughtful, complicated, and resolved. In anger, whether you like it or not, there is truth.

Anger is the demand of accountability, It is evaluation, judgment, and refutation. It is reflective, visionary, and participatory. It’s a speech act, a social statement, an intention, and a purpose. It’s a risk and a threat. A confirmation and a wish. It is both powerlessness and power, palliative and a provocation. In anger, you will find both ferocity and comfort, vulnerability and hurt. Anger is the expression of hope.

How much anger is too much? Certainly not the anger that, for many of us, is a remembering of a self we learned to hide and quiet. It is willful and disobedient. It is survival, liberation, creativity, urgency, and vibrancy. It is a statement of need. An insistence of acknowledgment. Anger is a boundary. Anger is boundless. An opportunity for contemplation and self-awareness. It is commitment. Empathy. Self-love. Social responsibility. If it is poison, it is also the antidote. The anger we have as women is an act of radical imagination. Angry women burn brighter than the sun.

In the coming years, we will hear, again, that anger is a destructive force, to be controlled. Watch carefully, because not everyone is asked to do this in equal measure. Women, especially, will be told to set our anger aside in favor of a kinder, gentler approach to change. This is a false juxtaposition. Reenvisioned, anger can be the most feminine of virtues: compassionate, fierce, wise, and powerful. The women I admire most—those who have looked to themselves and the limitations and adversities that come with our bodies and the expectations that come with them—have all found ways to transform their anger into meaningful change. In them, anger has moved from debilitation to liberation.

Your anger is a gift you give to yourself and the world that is yours. In anger, I have lived more fully, freely, intensely, sensitively, and politically. If ever there was a time not to silence yourself, to channel your anger into healthy places and choices, this is it.”
— Soraya Chemaly (Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger)

C.G. Jung
“Because we cannot discover God’s throne in the sky with a radiotelescope or establish (for certain) that a beloved father or mother is still about in a more or less corporeal form, people assume that such ideas are “not true.” I would rather say that they are not “true” enough, for these are conceptions of a kind that have accompanied human life from prehistoric times, and that still break through into consciousness at any provocation.

Modern man may assert that he can dispose with them, and he may bolster his opinion by insisting that there is no scientific evidence of their truth. Or he may even regret the loss of his convictions. But since we are dealing with invisible and unknowable things (for God is beyond human understanding, and there is no means of proving immortality), why should we bother about evidence? Even if we did not know by reason our need for salt in our food, we should nonetheless profit from its use. We might argue that the use of salt is a mere illusion of taste or a superstition; but it would still contribute to our well-being. Why, then, should we deprive ourselves of views that would prove helpful in crises and would give a meaning to our existence?

And how do we know that such ideas are not true? Many people would agree with me if I stated flatly that such ideas are probably illusions. What they fail to realize is that the denial is as impossible to “prove” as the assertion of religious belief. We are entirely free to choose which point of view we take; it will in any case be an arbitrary decision.

There is, however, a strong empirical reason why we should cultivate thoughts that can never be proved. It is that they are known to be useful. Man positively needs general ideas and convictions that will give a meaning to his life and enable him to find a place for himself in the universe. He can stand the most incredible hardships when he is convinced that they make sense; he is crushed when, on top of all his misfortunes, he has to admit that he is taking part in a “tale told by an idiot.”

It is the role of religious symbols to give a meaning to the life of man. The Pueblo Indians believe that they are the sons of Father Sun, and this belief endows their life with a perspective (and a goal) that goes far beyond their limited existence. It gives them ample space for the unfolding of personality and permits them a full life as complete persons. Their plight is infinitely more satisfactory than that of a man in our own civilization who knows that he is (and will remain) nothing more than an underdog with no inner meaning to his life.”
— C.G. Jung (Man and His Symbols)

Paul Harding
“But it’s a curse, a condemnation, like an act of provocation, to have been aroused from not being, to have been conjured up from a clot of dirt and hay and lit on fire and sent stumbling among the rocks and bones of this ruthless earth to weep and worry and wreak havoc and ponder little more than the impending return to oblivion, to invent hopes that are as elaborate as they are fraudulent and poorly constructed, and that burn off the moment they are dedicated, if not before, and are at best only true as we invent them for ourselves or tell them to others, around a fire, in a hovel, while we all freeze or starve or plot or contemplate treachery or betrayal or murder or despair of love, or make daughters and elaborately rejoice in them so that when they are cut down even more despair can be wrung from our hearts, which prove only to have been made for the purpose of being broken. And worse still, because broken hearts continue beating.”
— Paul Harding (Enon)
Nick Land
“Enigma, positive confusion (delirium), problematic, pain, whatever we want to call it; the torment of the philosophers in any case, is the stimulus to ecstatic creation, to an interminable “resolution” into the enhanced provocations of art. What the philosophers have never understood is this: it is the unintelligibility of the world alone that gives it worth. “Inertia needs unity (monism); plurality of interpretations a sign of strength. Not to desire to deprive the world of its disturbing and enigmatic character”. Not, then, to oppose pain to the absence of pain as metaphysical pessimism does, but, rather, to differentiate the ecstatic overcoming of pain from weariness and inertia, to exult in new and more terrible agonies, fears, burning perplexities as the resource of becoming, overcoming, triumph, the great libidinal oscillations that break up stabilized systems and intoxicate on intensity; that is Dionysian pessimism -“refusal to be deprived of the stimulus of the enigmatic”; “the effect of the work of art is to excite the state that creates art -intoxication”.”
— Nick Land (Fanged Noumena: Collected Writings, 1987-2007)
William Faulkner
“She turned now, facing him, as if she hand only been waiting until she became warm, the rich coat open upon the fragile glitter of her dress; there was a quality actually beautiful about her now-not of the face whose impeccable replica looks out from the covers of a thousand magazines each month, nor of the figure, the shape of deliberately epicene provocation into which the miles of celluloid film have constricted the female body of an entire race; but a quality completely female, in the old eternal fashion, primitive, assured and ruthless as she approched him … . “She said at once, now. So we can go. You see? Do you understand? We can leave now. Give her the money, let her have it all. We won’t care. …”
— William Faulkner (Collected Stories)
Nancy Jo Sales
“It’s people running around looking for anything to generate volume: Oh, teenage girls are taking their clothes off? And that’s getting a lot of hits? Then let’s turn a blind eye to the consequences. Oh, your daughter’s on Tinder? Well, she’s just meeting friends. It’s all about high-volume usage. I don’t think it’s necessarily a cynical, let’s destroy women thing – it’s how can I get my next quarter’s bonus?
And I think to the extent that the digital social media society normalizes impulses- think it, post it,” Roberts says, “we’ve also created a context for more and more provocative propositions, whatever they are: Look at my boobs. Do you want to hook up? It’s moved the bar for what’s normal and normalized extreme behavior; everything outrageous becomes normalized so rapidly. You realize how insane things are today when you think about the relative rate of change. When I was in high school, if I had gone around saying, Here’s a picture of me, like me, I would have gotten punched. If a girl went around passing out naked pictures of herself, people would have thought she needed therapy. Now that’s just Selfie Sunday.”

(— Paul Roberts quoted from the book)”
— Nancy Jo Sales (American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers)

Decoding Chinese Strategic Intent!


via Decoding Chinese Strategic Intent!

Interesting Newsletter from Nik


Would They Miss You If You Were Gone?

A simple definition for doing work that matters


Four years ago, after six months of hard work, I finally did it: My email list reached 10,000 subscribers. I was ecstatic.

10,000 people. That’s a small stadium. Imagine a sold out arena, waiting for you — just for you — to share your latest work. This would be my big break. I was sure of it. With 10,000 people marching behind me, nothing I make would ever fall flat again.

You can see where this is going. I’m about to swallow a bitter pill here.

Later that year, I heard Seth Godin define permission marketing:

If that email you were going to send to 10,000 people tomorrow — if it didn’t go out — how many of the 10,000 people would say: “Where is the email?!” If the answer is none, then you don’t have permission. You’re just being tolerated.

Convinced that my dedicated subscribers loved me, I decided to run an experiment: That week, I didn’t send out my newsletter. No announcement. No warning. I just skipped one email. What would happen? Who would ask for it? How many people? Would they be concerned? What would they say?

I woke up the next morning to a sobering realization: No one had emailed me. No one had asked for the newsletter. I waited. One day. Two. Three. Nothing. Crickets. No one missed me when I was gone. Ouch.

The all-important question in marketing, art, and doing great work is this: “What does it mean to matter?” According to Seth, there is a simple answer:

Would they miss you if you were gone? I don’t know who they are, I don’t know what gone means, but those people that you’re seeking to have an impact on, would they miss you if you didn’t show up tomorrow?

In my case, people didn’t. Maybe, they thought my newsletter was nice. Maybe, they enjoyed an article or two of mine. Clearly, however, none of my readers considered my work essential. They could easily do without it.

It hurts to find out that the tribe you’ve assembled with your blood, sweat, and tears will disband the second you stop talking to them, but the message it sends is clear: You never formed a real tribe in the first place. You just talked enough people into following along. You convinced them to take the flyer, to try the free sample, to sign up for the trial subscription — but you didn’t do the hard work of building a loyal relationship.

You just did “the hustle dance,” as Seth calls it:

Would they miss you if this new product, this new project didn’t come to the world? Or do you have to do that whole hustle dance, “Look at me, look at me,” jump up and down, offer for a limited time, bla bla bla… To game it so they’ll actually transact with you. That work doesn’t feel like it matters to me.

It’s easy to think you’re doing work that matters. That, somehow, your marketing is different. You have good intentions. You really want your audience to succeed. But you might still cut corners. We all succumb to the temptation sometimes.

Clickbait is still clickbait, even if you deliver on your promise. Selling is still selfish if your main goal is to make money. Giving gifts is not generous if it comes with expectations. In many ways, reciprocity has been corrupted.

If what you’re doing feels like playing a game, chances are, not many will miss you when you’re gone. You’re just another player who dropped out. Fine. Less competition. Less hassle. Less clutter in my inbox.

Here’s another question: Where is the sacrifice? How much are you really sweating? If we can’t see your effort in what you make for us, how can we know you mean what you say?

The only way to show people you have their best interest at heart is to actually do. You can’t fake it. You either do something selfless, or you don’t. It’s one of the few things in life that are surprisingly black and white and, most of the time, plain to see — at least on a long enough timeline.

When I didn’t hear back from my fans, when no one missed me when I was gone, I was devastated. I questioned everything I was doing. I changed things. I tried to do better.

Last year, I started another newsletter. I put in hard work. Real work. It grew fast. It was free. I sent it every day. I came up with themes. I wanted to help so badly. I really tried.

To this day, it’s not as big as my first one. It has about 5,000 subscribers. But, often, when I missed a day or didn’t share something in a while, a few people checked in. “Hey, Nik, are you okay?” “Hey Nik, where are the emails?”

It’s great to see you’re moving in the right direction. It feels good to be missed when you’re gone.

It’s okay. You’re not perfect. Take your time. Learn to stop dancing. Start making. Take your ego out of the equation. Not for a while. Not for this one thing. Completely.

Watch what happens. Watch how, slowly, the magic unfolds. Watch them start to miss you when you’re gone.

Write like a pro,
-Nik

PS: Want to take your writing game to the next level? Check out Write Like A Pro.

Surrender yourself to the cause of God.


Divine Love will make men selfless and helpful in their mutual relations and it will bring about the final solution of all problems. The new brotherhood on earth shall be a fulfilled fact and nations will be united in the fraternity of Love and Truth.
My existence is for this Love and this Truth; and to suffering humanity I say: Have hope.
I have come to help you in surrendering yourselves to the cause of God and in accepting His Grace of Love and Truth.
I have come to help you in winning the one Victory of all victories—to win your self.
——-AVATAR MEHER BABA
[GEMS FROM THE DISCOURSES OF MEHER BABA By Meher Baba. An Avatar Meher Baba Trust eBook June 2011. Copyright © 1945 by Circle Productions, Inc. (a New York Corporation), Copyright © Adi K. Irani, 1967 Copyright © 2007, Avatar Meher Baba Perpetual Public Charitable Trust, Ahmednagar, India.]

Examples of Rhetorical Devices


via Examples of Rhetorical Devices

Examples of Rhetorical Devices

rhetorical device uses words in a certain way to convey meaning or to persuade. It can also be a technique used to evoke emotions within the reader or audience.

Skilled writers use many different types of rhetorical devices in their work to achieve specific effects. Some types of rhetorical devices can also be considered figurative language because they depend on a non-literal usage of certain words or phrases.

Here are some common, and some not-so-common, examples of rhetorical devices that can be used to great effect in your writing:

Alliteration

Alliteration refers to the recurrence of initial consonant sounds. The phrase “rubber baby buggy bumpers” is one example you might remember from your childhood. Alliteration is often associated with tongue twisters for kids, but brand names commonly use this technique too, such as American Apparel, Best Buy, and Krispy Kreme.

Allusion

Allusion is a reference to an event, place, or person. For example, you might say, “I can’t get changed that quickly, I’m not Superman!” Referring to something well known allows the writer to make a point without elaborating in great detail.

Amplification

Amplification repeats a word or expression for emphasis, often using additional adjectives to clarify the meaning. “Love, real love, takes time” is an example of amplification because the author is using the phrase “real love” to distinguish his feelings from love that is mere infatuation.

Analogy

An analogy explains one thing in terms of another to highlight the ways in which they are alike. “He’s as flaky as a snowstorm” would be one example of an analogy. Analogies that are very well known sometimes fall into the categories of idioms or figures of speech.

Anaphora

Anaphora repeats a word or phrase in successive phrases. “If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh?” is an example from Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice. The use of anaphora creates parallelism and rhythm, which is why this technique is often associated with music and poetry. However, any form of written work can benefit from this rhetorical device.

Antanagoge

Antanagoge places a criticism and a compliment together to lessen the impact. “The car is not pretty, but it runs great” would be one example, because you’re referring to the vehicle’s good performance as a reason to excuse its unattractive appearance.

Antimetabole

Antimetabole repeats words or phrases in reverse order. The famous John F. Kennedy quote, “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country” is a well-known example.

Antiphrasis

Antiphrasis uses a word with an opposite meaning for ironic or humorous effect. “We named our chihuahua Goliath” is an example because a chihuahua is a very small dog and Goliath is a giant warrior from the famous Bible story.

Antithesis

Antithesis makes a connection between two things. Neil Armstrong said, “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” This pairs the idea of one man’s individual action with the greater implication for humanity as a whole.

Appositive

An appositive places a noun or noun phrase next to another noun for descriptive purposes. An example would be, “Mary, queen of this land, hosted the ball.” In this phrase, “queen of this land” is the appositive noun that describes Mary’s role.

Enumeratio

Enumeratio makes a point with details. For example, saying “The hotel renovation, including a new spa, tennis court, pool, and lounge, is finally complete” uses specific details to describe how large the renovation was.

Epanalepsis

Epanalepsis repeats something from the beginning of a clause or sentence at the end. Consider the Walmart slogan, “Always Low Prices. Always.” The repeated words act as bookends, driving the point home.

Epithet

An epithet is a descriptive word or phrase expressing a quality of the person or thing, such as calling King Richard I “Richard the Lionheart.” Contemporary usage often denotes an abusive or derogatory term describing race, gender, sexual orientation, or other characteristics of a minority group.

Epizeuxis

Epizeuxis repeats one word for emphasis. A child who says, “The amusement park was fun, fun, fun” is using epizeuxis to convey what a wonderful time he had at the park.

Hyperbole

Hyperbole refers to an exaggeration. Saying “I have done this a thousand times” to indicate that you’re very familiar with a task is an example of hyperbole because it is unlikely you’ve really performed the task a thousand times.

Litotes

Litotes make an understatement by using a negative to emphasize a positive. In this rhetorical device, a double negative is often used for effect. So saying someone is “not a bad singer” actually means you enjoyed hearing them sing.

Metanoia

Metanoia corrects or qualifies a statement. “You are the most beautiful woman in this town, nay the entire world” is an example of metanoia because the speaker is further clarifying the extent of the woman’s beauty.

Metaphor

metaphor is a type of implied comparison that compares two things by stating one is the other. “Your eyes are the windows of your soul” means you “see” someone’s emotional state by looking into their expressive eyes-eyes are not literally windows.

Metonymy

Metonymy is a type of metaphor where something being compared is referred to by something closely associated with it. For example, writers often refer to the “power of the pen” to convey the idea that the written word can inspire, educate, and inform. A pen has no power as an inanimate object, but the writer’s words can reach a broad audience.

Onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia refers to words that imitate the sound they describe, such as “plunk,” “whiz,” or “pop.” This type of figurative language is often used in poetry because it conveys specific images to the reader based on universal experiences. We are all familiar with the “squeal” of tires as a vehicle stops abruptly or the “jingle” of car keys in your pocket.

Oxymoron

An oxymoron creates a two-word paradox-such as “near miss” or “seriously funny.” An oxymoron is sometimes called a contradiction in terms and is most often used for dramatic effect.

Parallelism

Parallelism uses words or phrases with a similar structure. “Like father, like son” is an example of a popular phrase demonstrating parallelism. This technique creates symmetry and balance in your writing.

Simile

simile directly compares one object to another. “He smokes like a chimney” is one example. Similes are often confused with metaphors, but the main difference is that a simile uses “like” or “as” to make a comparison and a metaphor simply states the comparison.

Understatement

An understatement makes an idea less important than it really is. “The hurricane disrupted traffic a little” would be an understatement because hurricanes cause millions of dollars in damage and can lead to injuries or fatalities.

Be Persuasive

Now you see how these different examples of rhetorical devices work, you can use rhetorical devices in your own writing or speeches to create more interesting or persuasive content that sticks in the mind.

Rumi Quotes (Author of The Essential Rumi) | Goodreads


via Rumi Quotes (Author of The Essential Rumi) | Goodreads

RumiRumi > Quotes


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Rumi quotes Showing 1-30 of 2,076

“Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.”
― Rumi
“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing
and rightdoing there is a field.
I’ll meet you there.

When the soul lies down in that grass
the world is too full to talk about.”
― Rumi

“The wound is the place where the Light enters you.”
― Rumi
“Stop acting so small. You are the universe in ecstatic motion.”
― Rumi
“What you seek is seeking you.”
― Mawlana Jalal-al-Din Rumi
“Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself.”
― Rumi
“The minute I heard my first love story,
I started looking for you, not knowing
how blind that was.
Lovers don’t finally meet somewhere.
They’re in each other all along.”
― Mawlana Jalal-al-Din Rumi, The Illuminated Rumi
“Don’t grieve. Anything you lose comes round in another form.”
― Rumi
“Dance, when you’re broken open. Dance, if you’ve torn the bandage off. Dance in the middle of the fighting. Dance in your blood. Dance when you’re perfectly free.”
― Rumi
“If you are irritated by every rub, how will your mirror be polished?”
― Rumi
“Don’t be satisfied with stories, how things have gone with others. Unfold your own myth.”
― Rumi, The Essential Rumi
“You were born with wings, why prefer to crawl through life?”
― Rumi
“Forget safety.
Live where you fear to live.
Destroy your reputation.
Be notorious.”
― Rumi
“When you do things from your soul, you feel a river moving in you, a joy.”
― Rumi
tags: joy
“Knock, And He’ll open the door
Vanish, And He’ll make you shine like the sun
Fall, And He’ll raise you to the heavens
Become nothing, And He’ll turn you into everything.”
― Jalal Ad-Din Rumi
“When I am with you, we stay up all night.
When you’re not here, I can’t go to sleep.
Praise God for those two insomnias!
And the difference between them.”
― Rumi
tags: love
“Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.”
― Rumi
“My soul is from elsewhere, I’m sure of that, and I intend to end up there.”
― Mawlana Jalal-al-Din Rumi
“I want to see you.

Know your voice.

Recognize you when you
first come ’round the corner.

Sense your scent when I come
into a room you’ve just left.

Know the lift of your heel,
the glide of your foot.

Become familiar with the way
you purse your lips
then let them part,
just the slightest bit,
when I lean in to your space
and kiss you.

I want to know the joy
of how you whisper
“more”
― Mawlana Jalal-al-Din Rumi

“silence is the language of god,
all else is poor translation.”
― Rumi
“Sell your cleverness and buy bewilderment.”
― Rumi, Masnavi i Man’avi, the spiritual couplets of Maula
“Ignore those that make you fearful and sad, that degrade you back towards disease and death.”
― Rumi Jalalud-Din
“In your light I learn how to love. In your beauty, how to make poems. You dance inside my chest where no-one sees you, but sometimes I do, and that sight becomes this art.”
― Rumi
tags: love
“Lovers don’t finally meet somewhere. They’re in each other all along.”
― Mawlana Jalal-al-Din Rumi
“لا تجزع من جرحك، وإلا فكيف للنور أن يتسلل إلى باطنك؟”
― جلال الدين الرومي
“Everything in the universe is within you. Ask all from yourself.”
― Mawlana Jalal-al-Din Rumi
“Where there is ruin, there is hope for a treasure.”
― Rumi
“Let yourself be drawn by the stronger pull of that which you truly love.”
― Rumi
“I want to sing like the birds sing, not worrying about who hears or what they think.”
― Rumi
“Be grateful for whoever comes, because each has been sent as a guide from beyond.”
― Mawlana Jalal-al-Din Rumi

AEON+PSYCHE NEWSLETTER


Weekend reads
Saturday 22 August 2020
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Random Phrases of the day


  1. What Goes Up Must Come DownMeaning: Things that go up must eventually return to the earth due to gravity.
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