The wily and merciless veined octopus stalks an unsuspecting rock crab


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W.O.T.D.


WORD OF THE DAY
ZonkzoNGkPart of speech: verbOrigin: of imitative/echoic origin, mid-20th century
1Fall or cause to fall suddenly and heavily asleep or lose consciousness2Hit or strike.
 
Examples of Zonk in a sentence “Nothing makes me zonk out quite as quickly as NyQuil.” “The bowl zonked Cheryl when she tried to grab it from the top shelf.”

via Seth Godin’s Newsletter


Two ways to challenge the status quo [ https://p.feedblitz.com/r3.asp?l=178714945&f=1081591&c=7725851&u=5102652 ]

Slowly, or all at once.

Culture shifts slowly. “People like us do things like this.” Seismic events may make newspaper headlines, but they don’t rapidly change the way human beings in community behave.

Instead, the status quo erodes, redefining itself as it goes. If you’re the kind of person who believes in what’s all around us (which is most of us), then you won’t change your beliefs until the people around you change as well.

That’s why the smallest viable audience is so important. Focusing on a specific group of people, understanding their beliefs, engaging with empathy, creating new social norms and then, peer-to-peer, spreading the new normal.

Science, on the other hand, can shift more rapidly. A new paper detailing groundbreaking research on Parkinson’s disease, for example, can persuade 100 of the right doctors and funders of a paradigm shift. If they’re participating in the scientific method, they’ll do their research and change their assumptions.

And then, as always, it goes back to the slow move toward culture shift. It took twenty years for the medical community to embrace the fact that ulcers were caused by bacteria, not pastrami sandwiches. The bacteria didn’t care if the community believed in them, but the patients were glad the doctors made a new decision based on new information.

The culture is changing far more rapidly than it ever has before. And yet, it still changes slowly enough for us to grow impatient when important ideas and practices around health, justice and community are ignored.

And yet it changes. Persistent and consistent effort with focus is our only way forward.

Marshall Goldsmith Newsletter


My mission is simple. I want to help successful people achieve positive, lasting change in behavior; for themselves, their people, and their teams. I want to help you make your life a little better. Thank you for subscribing! Life is good.


Is Your Boss a Chief Critic Officer?

Marshall GoldsmithJun 8

One of the bad habits that I talk about in my best-selling book What Got You Here Won’t Get You There is “Passing judgment: the need to rate others and impose our standards on them.” Some of you may have a boss who does this, some of you may do this yourselves. Let’s analyze this bad habit.

While, there’s nothing wrong with offering an opinion in the normal give and take of business discussions, because you want people to agree or disagree freely, it’s not appropriate to pass judgment when we specifically ask people to voice their opinions about us. In those moments when other people have passed judgment on advice they have solicited from me, my first thought is, “Who died and made you Critic in Chief?”

This is true even if you ask a question and agree with the answer. Consciously or not, the other person will register your agreement, and he or she will remember it with great specificity when you don’t agree the next time. The contrast is telling. The person thinks, “What was wrong with what I said? Why did I bother?”

People don’t like to be critiqued, however obliquely. That’s why passing judgment is one of the more insidious ways we push people away and hold ourselves back from learning what we may need to know to achieve greater success. The only likely thing that comes out of passing judgment on people’s efforts to help us is that they probably won’t try to help us again.

How do we stop passing judgment, especially when people are honestly trying to help us?

Try this: For one week – every time you feel like making a judgment, treat the idea that comes your way from the person with complete neutrality. Think of yourself as a human Switzerland. Don’t take sides. Don’t express an opinion. Don’t judge the comment. If you find yourself constitutionally incapable of just saying “Thank you,” make it an innocuous, “Thanks, I hadn’t considered that.” Or, “Thanks. You’ve given me something to think about.”

After one week, I guarantee you will have significantly reduced the number of pointless arguments you engage in at work or at home. If you continue this for several weeks, at least three good things will happen.

First, you won’t have to think about this sort of neutral response; it will become automatic – as easy as saying “God bless you” when someone sneezes.

Second, you will have dramatically reduced the hours you devote to contentious interfacing. When you don’t judge an idea, no one can argue with you.

Third, people will gradually begin to see you as a much more open-minded person, even when you are not in fact agreeing with them. Do this consistently and people will eventually brand you as a welcoming person, someone whose door they can knock on when they have an idea, someone with whom they can spitball casual ideas and not end up spitting at each other.

Life is good. Marshall.

Did you know… Best Friends Day?


Did you know…

… that today is National Best Friends Day? Whether near or far, old or new, best friends are there in good times and bad. Tell your best friends how much you appreciate their friendship today!

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“The most beautiful discovery true friends make is that they can grow separately without growing apart.”

— Elisabeth Foley