EXIT THE FATHERLAND


VIA. CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SOUL NEWSLETTER


WORD OF THE DAY
Profundityprə-FUN-də-deePart of speech: nounOrigin: Late Middle English, late 14th century
1Deep insight; great depth of knowledge or thought.2Great depth or intensity of a state, quality, or emotion.
 
Examples of Profundity in a sentence “Critics praised the artist’s second album for the profundity of the lyrics.” “Even astronomers get swept up by the profundity of space.”

W.O.T.D.


WORD OF THE DAY
Profundityprə-FUN-də-deePart of speech: nounOrigin: Late Middle English, late 14th century
1Deep insight; great depth of knowledge or thought.2Great depth or intensity of a state, quality, or emotion.
 
Examples of Profundity in a sentence “Critics praised the artist’s second album for the profundity of the lyrics.” “Even astronomers get swept up by the profundity of space.”

WISDOM



All your actions you make today can bring you a better tomorrow.
What you do today can improve all your tomorrows. (Ralph Marston)
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There’s no greater risk that the one that comes from trying something without knowing what you’re doing.
Risk comes from not knowing what you’re doing. (Warren Buffett)

5 INTERESTING PHRASES


  1. There’s No I in Team Meaning: To not work alone, but rather, together with others in order to achieve a certain goal.
  2. On Cloud Nine Meaning: Having strong feelings of happiness or satisfaction.
  3. Cry Over Spilt Milk Meaning: It’s useless to worry about things that  already happened and cannot be changed.
  4. Quick On the Draw Meaning: Performing an action with the greatest of haste.
  5. Drive Me Nuts Meaning: To greatly frustrate someone. To drive someone crazy, insane, bonkers, or bananas.

Monarchists – by SEth Godin


Monarchists [ https://p.feedblitz.com/r3.asp?l=178564381&f=1081591&c=7711417&u=5102652 ]

For as long as there’s been recorded history, kings and queens have ruled and been celebrated by their subjects. Not everywhere, not all the time, but widely.

Not simply the royalty of nations, but of organizations as well.

It’s worth noting that in addition to monarchs, there are monarchists, citizens and employees and followers who prefer the certainty that comes from someone else.

Royalty offers something to some of those who are ruled. If it didn’t, it wouldn’t exist.

As Sahlins and Graeber outline in their extraordinary (and dense) book on Kings, there’s often a pattern in the nature of monarchs. Royalty doesn’t have to play by the same cultural rules, and often ‘comes from away.’ Having someone from a different place and background allows the population to let themselves off the hook when it comes to creating the future.

If your participation in leadership is not required, then you’re free to simply be a spectator.

When we industrialized the world over the last century, we defaulted to this structure. Many Western industrial organizations began as founder-celebrated and founder-driven. CEOs could, apparently, do no wrong. Until the world their business operated in changed.

In large corporations, the autocratic, well-paid chieftain has the trappings of a monarch. A private air force, minions and the automatic benefit of the doubt. Working in this setting requires obedience and effort from employees more than agency or independence.

A well-functioning constitutional monarchy is surprisingly effective. That’s not the problem. The problem is what happens when it stops to function well. The problem can happen when royalty becomes selfish, shortsighted or impatient. Or the problem could be a pattern of employees or members or citizens failing to participate. Resilience disappears and the system becomes brittle.

When the world changes, and it does, faster than ever, it’s community and connection that moves us forward.

Modern organizations are discovering that all of us know more than any of us, and that engaged individuals ready to not only speak up but to eagerly take responsibility for the work they do is an effective, resilient and equitable way to show up in the world.

W.O.T.D.


WORD OF THE DAY
Consanguineouskan-sang-GWIN-ee-usPart of speech: adjectiveOrigin: Latin, early 17th century
1Relating to or denoting people descended from the same ancestor.
 
Examples of Consanguineous in a sentence “You look so similar you could be consanguineous!” “The patients are not consanguineous; they are husband and wife.”

This Styrofoam-like packaging is made of popcorn—not plastic


Mongolia’s deadly sandstorms via below the fold newsletter


Mongolia’s deadly sandstorms
Sat May 30

Mongolians are getting buried alive in the worst sandstorm season in a decade, affecting both Chinese and Mongolian regions bordering the Gobi Desert. The series of eight storms persisted over the past three months, leading to the deaths of nine herders and 1.6 million livestock so far, hundreds of cancelled flights, and pollution 20 times over the healthy limit, exacerbating respiratory issues.

Though it’s not from a lack of foresight. Starting in 1978, China has planted 66 billion trees along its border with the Gobi in anticipation of future sandstorms. But this year’s sandstorms were so severe that sand hurled well above the line of trees intended as a protective wall. These sandstorms are so massive because of:Climate change, of course, as Mongolia not only experienced an unusually dry year, but temperatures have increased by about four degrees Fahrenheit in the last 70 years.Overgrazing, as the number of livestock animals tripled over the last three decades. For example, the region’s goat population has grown from five to 27 million and produces 40% of the world’s cashmere, causing concern over the death tolls from these storms.Environmental degradation from all sides. The aforementioned goats eat twice as much grass as sheep thereby destroying pastureland at an unsustainable rate. Meanwhile widespread mining of gold, coal, and copper has stripped vegetation and dried up water sources, accelerating desertification.Experts worry that unless the situation can be brought under control, Mongolia could be entirely desert within the next 40 years. While efforts to prevent desertification have been ongoing for decades — such as subsidies to help herding families reduce livestock — the quality of life for many Mongolians leave little room for more sacrifice.

Did you know…


Did you know…

… that today is White House Marriage Day? In an 1886 White House ceremony, President Grover Cleveland married Frances Folsom. He was the first and only U.S. president to marry at the White House while in office. Trivia fans: John Tyler and Woodrow Wilson both married while in office but not at the White House.

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Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“I would rather the man who presents something for my consideration subject me to a zephyr of truth and a gentle breeze of responsibility rather than blow me down with a curtain of hot wind.”

— Grover Cleveland